EVENTS AND PUBLIC HOLIDAYS IN TRINIDAD

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Indian Arrival Day

Indian Arrival Day commemorates the arrival of the first Indian Indentured labourers from India to Trinidad, in May 1845, on the ship Fatel Razack. The Fatel Razack brought not only a new labour force to assist in the economic development of Trinidad, but also a new people with a new culture.

Corpus Christi

In Trinidad and Tobago Corpus Christi (Body of Christ) is a Christian feast celebrating the Holy Eucharist. The feast which is primarily celebrated by the Roman Catholic Church celebrates the death and resurrection of Christ with Mass or Communion whereby, Christians partake in a representation of Christ's body and blood.

Labour Day

In Trinidad and Tobago Labour Day was declared an annual national holiday in 1973. Celebrated on June 19th, it is the anniversary of the day of the Butler Oilfield Riots which took place in 1937.

Emancipation Day

On August 1, 1838, the enslaved Africans throughout the British Empire in the Caribbean were freed from slavery. In Trinidad and Tobago August 1, 1985, Emancipation Day was declared a national holiday and has since grown into a major national festival, where thousands of people participate in various activities.

Independence Day

This day commemorates Trinidad and Tobago's independence from Britain in 1962. At midnight on 30th August 1962, the Union Jack (British flag) was lowered and the Trinidad and Tobago flag was raised for the first time.

Republic Day

Trinidad and Tobago became a Republic on August 1st, 1976. The event is celebrated as a public holiday on September 24th because this is the date when the first Parliament met under the new Republican Constitution.

Christmas Day

Christmas is known to be a religious observance of Christianity celebrating the birth of Christ. However, in Trinidad and Tobago Christmas has expanded well beyond religion to come a cultural celebration.

Boxing Day

No one knows for sure when Boxing Day started, but some believe it was centuries ago, when servants would be given the day after Christmas off as a day of rest after feverish preparations for their masters' celebrations.